Posts tagged ‘Technology’

Big Data Tools Need to Get Out of the Stone Age: Business Users and Data Scientists Need Applications, Not Technology Stacks

By Terence Craig

Things have been crazy at PatternBuilders recently. The excitement and positive reactions to FinancePBI, our Financial Services big data analytics solution, from media, analysts, venture folks, cloud infrastructure partners, and users has been amazing.  Our new cross industry graphical big data correlation mashups are generating a lot of excitement as well—we like to call this feature Google Correlate on steroids. Check out how our newest partner analytics consultancy, InsightVoices, has used it to find relationships between stock prices and traffic sensor data.

Mary’s recent post on Strata West 2012 provides a great overview of how hot the hype cycle around big data has become (while managing to work in a plug for her favorite gory TV series as well). In case you’re still not convinced, here are some additional nuggets:

  • The market for big data technology worldwide is expected to grow from $3.2 billion in 2010 to $16.9 billion in 2015, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 40% (hat tip to IDC).
  • The amount of big data being generated continues to grow exponentially, now being expected to double in two years. This is largely driven by social networks, smartphones, and really cool IP-enabled devices like the Fitbit and this IPhone-based brain scanning device by our new Strata buddy Tan Le at Emotiv Lifesciences. Yes, she is much smarter than us but we like her anyway!
  • The White House is even doing its share, investing $200 million a year in access and funding to help propel big data sets, techniques, and technologies while giving a shout out to our friends at Data Without Borders.

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April 18, 2012 at 2:34 pm 5 comments

Data and Technology Have No Moral Compass: But that does not mean that we get to abdicate all responsibility.

By Mary Ludloff

I do not consider myself an idealist and I would not call myself naive. That being said, as Terence and I engaged in research for our book, Privacy and Big Data, there were moments when I threw up my hands and said, “Really?” Certainly, the recent spate of articles on surveillance technologies and how governments around the world are buying and using those technologies to, for want of a better term, spy on its citizens gave me pause.

Don’t get me wrong—I know these technologies exist. I am also very aware that the regulatory environment does not really address what devices or applications built on top of these technologies can do. The reality is that companies like Datong sell “intelligence solutions” to the military, law enforcement, and intelligence agencies around the world. Recently, an article in the Guardian revealed that: (more…)

November 17, 2011 at 9:06 pm 3 comments

Maps: Lessons Learned

Recently we’ve been adding new user-friendly features to our platform and I’d like to talk about our map view. In particular, I want to discuss the lessons we learned from the map in the first version of the PAF (PatternBuilders Analytics Framework) versus the one in our new Silverlight client.

You may have already seen some screenshots of the map in our AJAX web client – when we released the first versions of PAF, we integrated with Google Maps to help users see their data on a map for quick comparisons and analysis. It’s always been a helpful tool, but suffered from a learning curve for new users and could potentially confuse people due to the way it displayed data.

The AJAX Client Map View

The AJAX Client Map View

Showing time series data on a map is a tricky proposition – the map is already two dimensional, and the addition of the two dimensions of time series analytics takes it into the 4th dimension. As exciting as it would be to see a four dimensional map view (we’d definitely be the only company doing it!), I don’t think most human beings would be able to understand it.

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September 6, 2011 at 8:04 am Leave a comment

Gartner, Hype Cycles, and Big Data

By Mary Ludloff

Gartner Hype Cycle Greetings all! While we’ve been super busy at PatternBuilders working on a destination application that we are all very excited about, doing some development work, talking with potential partners and prospects, AND not to mention the fact (but I will) that Terence and I are getting close to the finish line on our book, I came across this interesting article on Gartner’s hype cycle and the recent addition of big data to it.

Now, I am pretty sure that you all are familiar with Gartner’s magic quadrant methodology that essentially evaluates all the particular technology players in a specific industry across four quadrants: challengers, leaders, niche players, and visionaries. For those companies looking at vendors for a specific solution, the magic quadrant can help them understand how they stack up against each other. For the vendors, it’s an opportunity to take an objective look at the industry as a whole and understand what they do well and where they could be better. (more…)

August 17, 2011 at 8:37 am 2 comments

It’s About Time: Series Data, Streaming, & Architecture

 

In previous posts, we have talked a lot about the PatternBuilders Analytics platform and streaming analytics. This platform is able to scale for huge amounts of data and stream results to the user as they are processed in real time. As mentioned before, we can do this because we have focused on time series analytics, making optimizations to our architecture that beat generalized MapReduce types of solutions by orders of magnitude. I’d like to discuss this focus and how it came about.

Why time series data?

Time series data is ubiquitous. It’s actually more difficult to think of an analytics question a user would be interested in that doesn’t involve time in some capacity. Even a non-numeric query like “Order the list of products by units sold” is almost useless without specifying a time period for which to sort. (more…)

July 14, 2011 at 6:20 pm 7 comments

MongoSF: Our Streaming Analytics Video is Now Available

By Terence Craig

As you all know, Tim and I spoke at MongoSF recently. Our session was focused on how to build a streaming analytics system with Mongo. For those of you who might have missed this post thread, here are the highlights (with the appropriate links):

Our session was videotaped and I am happy to announce that it is now available on the 10gen site. You’ll notice that we got a lot of great questions. If, after viewing the video, you have some thoughts or questions please send them my way through comments or email—it may take me some time (we are, as Mary said in her last post, crazy busy right now), but I will follow up!

July 11, 2011 at 11:53 am 4 comments

We love .NET

PatternBuilders sells a hosted cross platform streaming analytics platform that large companies use to do complex calculations and business process automation over very large data sets. So it was fascinating to read a recent post/troll from the CEO of a company that is writing yet another web based expense tracking system about how bad our technology and hiring choices were. Since we never like to pass up a good scrap – it seemed like a good time for a guest post from our lead server engineer Tim.

By Tim L.

Programmers with "Attitude"I don’t really understand why David Barrett wasted time writing his rant on .NET programmers. Doing a minimal amount of research on what .NET is, what you can do with it, and how people use it would have completely invalidated his original premises. He makes a lot of statements regarding how “different” .NET is from everything else, how restrictive it is, and how no programmer with “attitude” would ever use it.

Well, judging by his criteria, I think I am a programmer with attitude. I have been programming since I was 9, starting out with Basic and then moving on to C++ for about 7 years. I don’t know about knife fighting, but I do play guitar in a death metal band on the side. Hopefully those are enough “attitude” credentials for David Barrett. I have tried a whole lot of different tools, and guess what? .NET & C# are my favorite tools for almost any problem. Ironically, the only things I would write using other toolsets would be either very simple/small pieces of code, or big software for companies that force me to use something else (usually Java).
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April 8, 2011 at 12:25 pm 5 comments

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